The Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church attributes the work of Satan to the hand of God!

jefferts-schoriIn Acts 16:16-40 we are told about a slave girl who was able to foretell the future through the power of an evil spirit that had possessed her. This slave girl kept following Paul and shouting “These men are servants of the Most High God, who are telling you the way to be saved. (Act 16:17 NIV).” Paul eventually cast the spirit from this slave girl and her owners, who were no longer were able to profit from her divination abilities, had Paul thrown in jail.

The presiding Episcopal bishop Rev. Katharine Jefferts Schori, ignoring the context of this passage, the biblical prohibitions against divination (Duet. 18:10-14), and examples where Jesus himself faced similar circumstances and responded much as Paul did (Lk. 4:41), has concluded that the work of this demon was in fact a spiritual gift given to this slave girl by God and that Paul, in his sin, destroyed this slave girl’s spiritual gift. The following is an excerpt from her sermon, the entire sermon can be read below.

Paul is annoyed at the slave girl who keeps pursuing him, telling the world that he and his companions are slaves of God.  She is quite right.  She’s telling the same truth Paul and others claim for themselves. But Paul is annoyed, perhaps for being put in his place, and he responds by depriving her of her gift of spiritual awareness.  Paul can’t abide something he won’t see as beautiful or holy, so he tries to destroy it.  It gets him thrown in prison.  That’s pretty much where he’s put himself by his own refusal to recognize that she, too, shares in God’s nature, just as much as he does – maybe more so! “

This is not the only serious error in her sermon. Much of her sermon alludes to the acceptance of universalism; there is no discussion of the fallen state of mankind nor our need for a savior, and homosexuality, like divination, is lauded as something good. She talks about many good things, but the message of the gospel has been entirely lost. It appears that this Bishop has walked away from the Christian faith; hopefully she has not already brought the entire Episcopal church with her.

========== Here are the contents of the entire sermon ============

All Saints Church, Steenrijk, Curaçao [Diocese of Venezuela]
12 May 2013

The Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts Schori
Presiding Bishop and Primate
The Episcopal Church

The beauty of this place is legendary.  It is beautiful – and fragile, for its beauty depends on a dynamic balance among the parts of this island system.  Many people don’t notice beauty around them until it’s gone.  When we go somewhere that looks very different, often it takes a long time to appreciate that it has beauty, even though it’s a different kind of beauty.  Some people never do learn to value the different kinds of loveliness in the world around us.  One of the gifts of this remarkable island is its diverse mixture of desert and tropics on land and sea – and even more so, the beauty of its different peoples, languages, and heritages.  Yet the history of this place tells some tragic stories about the inability of some to see the beauty in other skin colors or the treasure of cultures they didn’t value or understand.

Human beings have a long history of discounting and devaluing difference, finding it offensive or even evil.  That kind of blindness is what leads to oppression, slavery, and often, war.  Yet there remains a holier impulse in human life toward freedom, dignity, and the full flourishing of those who have been kept apart or on the margins of human communities.  It’s a tendency that seems to emerge along a common timeline.  Formal legal structures that permitted human slavery ended here and in many parts of the world within a relatively short span of time.  It doesn’t mean that slavery is finished today, but at least it’s no longer legal in most places.  Even so, slavery continues in the form of human trafficking and the kind of exploitation that killed so many garment workers in Bangladesh recently.

We live with the continuing tension between holier impulses that encourage us to see the image of God in all human beings and the reality that some of us choose not to see that glimpse of the divine, and instead use other people as means to an end.  We’re seeing something similar right now in the changing attitudes and laws about same-sex relationships, as many people come to recognize that different is not the same thing as wrong.  For many people, it can be difficult to see God at work in the world around us, particularly if God is doing something unexpected.

There are some remarkable examples of that kind of blindness in the readings we heard this morning, and slavery is wrapped up in a lot of it.  Paul is annoyed at the slave girl who keeps pursuing him, telling the world that he and his companions are slaves of God.  She is quite right.  She’s telling the same truth Paul and others claim for themselves.[1]  But Paul is annoyed, perhaps for being put in his place, and he responds by depriving her of her gift of spiritual awareness.  Paul can’t abide something he won’t see as beautiful or holy, so he tries to destroy it.  It gets him thrown in prison.  That’s pretty much where he’s put himself by his own refusal to recognize that she, too, shares in God’s nature, just as much as he does – maybe more so!  The amazing thing is that during that long night in jail he remembers that he might find God there – so he and his cellmates spend the night praying and singing hymns.

An earthquake opens the doors and sets them free, and now Paul and his friends most definitely discern the presence of God.  The jailer doesn’t – he thinks his end is at hand.  This time, Paul remembers who he is and that all his neighbors are reflections of God, and he reaches out to his frightened captor.  This time Paul acts with compassion rather than annoyance, and as a result the company of Jesus’ friends expands to include a whole new household.  It makes me wonder what would have happened to that slave girl if Paul had seen the spirit of God in her.

The reading from Revelation pushes us in the same direction, outward and away from our own self-righteousness, inviting us to look harder for God’s gift and presence all around us.  Jesus says he’s looking for everybody, anyone who’s looking for good news, anybody who is thirsty.  There are no obstacles or barriers – just come.  God is at work everywhere, even if we can’t or won’t see it immediately.

The gospel insists that Jesus has given glory to the growing company of his friends and disciples so they can be all be one.  When we recognize the glory of another human being, we become her advocate, and we begin to see him as friend.  The word that’s used for glory has echoes that speak of awe, and gravitas, and deep significance.  The glory we’ve received is something like a grand ceremonial garment, maybe even a shining face like Moses’, that says to those around us, “here comes the image of God.”  The world begins to change when we see that glorious skin shining on our brothers’ and sisters’ faces.

The great loves in our lives come from a deep recognition of the glory in another human being and a desire to share that glory.  When Jesus speaks of oneness, he’s moving in that direction.  What would the world be like if we could love not only our lovers, but every human being with that kind of starry-eyed passion?  The glory is there to see in all of us.  Certainly God sees that glory.  Most of us have eyes that can see that glory in one or a few other human beings.  Learning to see that glory all around us is a good part of what the Christian life is all about.  Slavery, war, and discrimination are only possible when we fail to see the glory in those people.  Why does Jesus tell us to pray for our enemies, except to begin to discern their glory?

We live in a time when we need to see the glory of God in every other human being, and also in the rest of creation.  This fragile earth, our island home, is also shining with the glory of its creator.  If human beings are going to flourish on this planet, we’ll need to learn to see the glory of God at work in all its parts.  When we can be awed at the beauty of a sunset or the delicate complexity of an orchid or the remarkable diversity of a coral reef, we’ll be much more wary about using it for our own selfish ends.

Looking for the reflection of God’s glory all around us means changing our lenses, or letting the scales on our eyes fall away.  That kind of change isn’t easy for anyone, but it’s the only road to the kingdom of God.  We are here, among all the other creatures of God’s creation, to be transformed into the glory intended from the beginning.  The next time we feel the pain of that change, perhaps instead of annoyance or angry resentment we might pray for a new pair of glasses.  When resentment about difference or change builds up within us, it’s really an invitation to look inward for the wound that cries out for a healing dose of glory.  We will find it in the strangeness of our neighbor.  Celebrate that difference – for it’s necessary for the healing of this world – and know that the wholeness we so crave lies in recognizing the glory of God’s creative invitation.  God among us in human form is the most glorious act we know.  We are meant to be transformed into the same kind of glory.  Let’s pray that God’s glory may shine in us and in all creatures!

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Comments

  1. Richard says:

    Do they even preach sin and repentence anymore in TEC? WOW!

  2. Richard C. August says:

    Thank God Almighty, the entire Episcopal Churches’ congregations have not succumbed to Bishop Katherine’s damnable heresies. Though these congregations have lost buildings and properties, and entered into other bishoprics in the Anglican Communion, they have gained so much by preaching the Gospel of Jesus Christ to the lost. They have told these sinners that they are welcome, and they must drop their sins at the foot of the Cross in repentance. They must be baptized not just by water in the Name of the Father and Son and Holy Spirit – they must be washed in Jesus Christ’s blood, the true Baptism that leads to remission of sins; where we leave our sins in Jesus’s dead body in the tomb, that we may rise every day as new creations in God as Christ rose from the dead that first Easter.

    All this “Rev. Kathy” preaches is stuff to fill pews with warm bodies. Please don’t be surprised if she walks up the church aisle wearing a rainbow colored stole, forgetting from whence the rainbow came in Genesis 9:13 after God established a covenant with Noah and his family to FILL THE EARTH with humans and animals, and that God will no longer destroy the earth by flood.

    “Rev. Kathy” forgets that she, too, was born of the conjugal relationship between her father and her mother, and that she, too, has children by her husband. Well, her husband must wear a dress and scrub toilets, right? Perhaps this does not sound very Christ-like of me, though I have no kind words to say of this “drag king” in complete denial and renunciation of Holy Scriptures.

    God bless those Anglican Congregations and their Priests who walked out when she matriculated in.

    1. Mike Tisdell says:

      Thanks for taking a stand for God’s word.

    2. Mike Tisdell says:

      Thanks for taking a stand for God’s word.